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Bloggers, take time to write quality content




About DJC

The older I get, the less I know and the more inquisitive I get.

Unfortunately, despite a lifelong search, most of the answers elude me. That said, I love to ask the questions and fuel the debates that will ultimately lead us all to a better understanding of the big issues in life, the universe and everything.

They say that we spend 98% of our lives in our head. I for one would like to use that time as effectively as possible.


There is significant variability in the time bloggers take to craft high-quality content, according to US research.

It can take a great deal of time to craft a high-quality blog post. In fact nearly half of bloggers - or 48.2 per cent - take one to three hours.

Write abut the things you know about, like gardening.

Write abut the things you know about, like gardening. Picture: Shutterstock

There is significant variability in the time that bloggers take to craft high-quality content, according to US research. Headline findings were as follows:

  • 1 hour – 7%
  • 1-2 hours – 24.7%
  • 2-3 hours – 23.5%
  • 3-4 hours – 19%
  • 4-6 hours – 13.3%
  • 6+ hours – 11.9%
  • Of course, there are strategies you can employ to minimise the time it takes, including: writing on subjects you know a lot about; writing on a series on the same general subject; accessing the same research; keeping the article short; and developing your writing skills.

    Else>>>portantly, however, what makes a blog a quality blog?

    There are a number of factors. One of those factors involves ensuring that the article is easy to read. This in turn involves, among other things:

  • Sign posting
  • Using plain English
  • Editing and proofing
  • A relevant heading and the use of subheadings can make any article easier to read, meaning it's more likely to be read. Using bullet points in place of long copy can also help busy audiences.

    Jargon can help to make the reader look smarter than he or she is, but makes an article harder to read. Jargon well explained can give reader something to repeat and look informed, but terminology that is not readily understood is counter-productive.

    I am very poor with spelling and quite average with grammar. I am also aware that poor spelling and grammar makes an article harder to read and less credible. That is why I now have someone proof all of my blog posts. This has increased readership significantly.

    There are ways of minimising the time it takes to draft a blog post, but it is important to take the time to write quality content. Content is not king, but quality content can be.

    Source of core statistics – FITSMALLBUSINESS.COM

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